Digging Through the Compilation Shelf.

compgridCompilations were a fucking way of life. They were the best route to find new bands. They were around long before the internet was THE INTERNET. They were around long before Spotify, BandCamp, SoundCloud, and other services made it easy to “try before you buy.” They’re things that don’t really happen anymore. One part is because of the internet. Another is the overall decline of brick and mortar record stores. They’re not financially viable to manufacture and distribute anymore, and it’s kind of bummer.

Without pulling the shitty “back in my day” card, the decline of record stores and readily available physical products has been the biggest change in music that I’ve seen. I’m old enough to remember a time before file sharing, iTunes, and web commerce as a viable option for music existed. Small record labels, if they had websites at all, still lived on mailorder. You printed out a form, mailed them a money order or some shit, and waited. Oh, how you waited. It wasn’t the most conducive way to discover music. You could read liner notes, but if bands didn’t thank any other bands it was a no-go. So you turned to local record store, and their “compilation” section.

I’ve always been broke. That definitely made it hard for me to discover new bands in my teenage years. I couldn’t afford to buy albums all the time, and it had to be worth it if I was going to drop the $16 at Tower Records. So I always dug through the compilations. At around $2 a pop, they were the best things in the world. If i was curious about some new band on Lookout! Records or something, just go grab their most recent one. Same with Asian Man, Epitaph, Fat Wreck, Go Kart, Matador, Hopeless, BYO, Vagrant, Deep Elm, and so on et cetera. You’d get to hear that new band you were wondering about, and probably some unreleased song from a band you liked already. How could you go wrong?

The first compilation cd I ever bought was probably Mailorder Is Still Fun. As I touched on in another thing, Asian Man Records was my jam. I was mail ordering a bunch of records, and decided to get this compilation. As a teenage ska fan, it was the best I could have hoped for. Slow Gherkin, Less Than Jake, The Chinkees, and MU330 were all on it. Through that compilation I got introduced to Korea Girl, who I still believe to be one of the most criminally underrated indie rock bands in the world. I heard Alkaline Trio and The Broadways for the first time. 16 year old me was stoked. And that compilation was already 2 years old by the time I bought it.

It all spiraled from there. The first time I heard Camber, Planes Mistaken For Stars, and Brandtson was on Deep Elm Sampler #3 (Sound Spirit Fury Fire). The first time I heard The Mr. T Experience, Bratmobile, and Common Rider was on Lookout! Freakout Episode 2. And Hopelessly Devoted To You Vol. 3 was where I first heard Dillinger Four, The Queers, and The Weakerthans (it also sparked me into buying one of my all time favorite records, Left And Leaving). Marc’s A Dick And Gar’s A Drunk: The Johann’s Face Story is where I first heard the Traitors and No Empathy. What I’m saying is that compilations were always important to me. In that spirit, I wanted to make a quick list of my favorite compilations. I’ve linked them to their respective page on Discogs. In no particular order.

Honorable mentions go to Short Music For Short People and Fat Music Volume 5: Live Fat, Die Young (both Fat Wreck Chords). The former for absolutely fucking nailing the gimmick. The latter for having one of my favorite Propagandhi songs.

If this kind of stuff had a resurgence, I’d be right there ready to go.

REVIEW: Off With Their Heads – "In Desolation"

I was late to the game in regards to Off With Their Heads. I did not hear Hospitals until 2008. Basically, I slept on that record for 2 years. I was pretty mad that I did.

A lot can be said for an album that is so fucking catchy, but still so fucking dark. For their Epitaph debut, OWTH have basically taken parts of all their previous releases, and mixed them down to a coherent release.

The songs on In Desolation would stand up against anything in their vast discography. But, with the Epitaph production budget, this record just SOUNDS great. Production wise, it sounds better than an album this dirty has a right to. But, it is not overproduced.

This album is short of filler. Gun to my head, I am not really digging “My Episodes” very much. It almost kills the momentum of the record. This is still an ok song, it just sticks out a little too much. Luckily it falls right at the end of the album, rather than smack in the middle.

As far as stand out song, “Clear The Air” is probably my favourite on the record. It is an excellent closer, and a generally fantastic song. “ZZYZX” is another one of those “fuck you, i just want to be left the fuck alone” type songs. And, goddamnit if they did not do a good job of it. The lead off single “Drive” works well as an album opener. It sets the pace for the whole album well. As for the “deluxe” version Epitaph is selling, there is an extra song called “I May Be A Lot Of Shitty Things, But At Least I’m Not A Rapist Like You.” Pretty much a fuck you song. Great all the way around.

Enough bullshit though. Basically, if you were a fan of Off With Their Heads before, you have no reason not to like this record. A lot of shit has been said about this being released on Epitaph, but disregard any of that. Epitaph got themselves a winner here. Buy this record if you like catchy as hell songs about drugs, depression, stress, and anger. It is a cathartic album, and sometimes that is all you need. I will throw this 4.5 out of 5.